Support | Glossary


  • 3G (3rd Generation Mobile Telecommunications): a generation of standards for mobile phones and mobile telecommunication services fulfilling the International Mobile Telecommunications-2000 (IMT — 2000) specifications by the International Telecommunication Union. Application services may include wide-area wireless voice telephone, mobile Internet access, video calls and mobile TV, all in a mobile environment.
  • 3rd Party: implies a party other than the manufacturer or the reseller. In the case of Cruz devices, 3rd party may refer to any app not preinstalled, or any website or service that is not associated with Velocity Micro Cruz devices. Velocity Micro does not provide support for or warrant the usability of any 3rd party software or service with our Cruz tablets.
  • AAC (Advanced Audio Coding): is a standardized, lossy compression and encoding scheme for digital audio. Designed to be the successor of the MP3 format, AAC generally achieves better sound quality than MP3 at similar bit rates.
  • Android (Operating System): Android is a software stack for mobile devices that includes an operating system, middleware and key applications. Google Inc. purchased the initial developer of the software, Android Inc., in 2005. Android's mobile operating system is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. Google and other members of the Open Handset Alliance collaborated on Android's development and release. The Android Open Source Project (AOSP) is tasked with the maintenance and further development of Android. The Android operating system is the world's best-selling Smartphone platform.
  • Android Market : an online software store developed by Google for Android devices. An application (app) called Market is preinstalled on most Android devices and allows users to browse and download apps published by third-party developers, hosted on the Android Market. Users can also search for and read detailed information about apps from the Android Market website.
  • App/Application : is computer software designed to help the user to perform a set of related specific tasks. Many application programs deal principally with documents while others specifically with hardware. The .APK file extension denotes an Android Package (APK) file. This file format, a variant of the JAR format, is used for distributing and installing bundled components or apps onto a device running the Android operating system.
  • AVI (Audio Visual Interleave): a multimedia container format introduced by Microsoft in November 1992 as part of its Video for Windows technology. AVI files can contain both audio and video data in a file container that allows synchronous audio-with-video playback. Like the DVD video format, AVI files support multiple streaming audio and video, although these features are seldom used.
  • Browser : A web browser or Internet browser is a software client application for retrieving, presenting, and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web. An information resource is identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) and may be a web page, image, video, or other piece of content.
  • Capacitive Screen: The term “capacitance” literally means “the ability to hold electrical charge.” A capacitive touch screen emits an electrical current from each of the screen’s four corners. Since the human body holds an electrical charge, the user’s finger disturbs the electrical current when it touches the screen. The Cruz’s processor translates the X and Y coordinates of the input. The result is a highly responsive and intuitive touch screen surface, since it has nothing to do with the pressure of your touch.
  • Client: To help you understand Client/Server relationships better, a client is a program, usually with a simple graphical user interface (GUI) that allows you to connect across a network, like the Internet, to a Server for a particular purpose. More simply put, an Android-based client is an app that runs on your Android device and connects to a server in order to exchange information. For example eBuddy is an Instant Messaging client, Twidroyd is a client to access your Twitter account, and MailDroid and K-9 are both Android-based email clients.
  • Download: In computer networks, to download means to receive data to a local system from a remote system, or to initiate such a data transfer. Examples of a remote system from which a download might be performed include a webserver, FTP server, email server, or other similar systems. Examples of a local system to which a download might be performed. A download can mean either any file that is offered for downloading or that has been downloaded, or the process of receiving such a file.
  • DRM (Digital Rights Management): is a term for access control technologies that can be used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals to limit the usage of digital content and devices. The term is used to describe any technology that inhibits uses of digital content not desired or intended by the content provider. Digital rights management is used by companies such as Sony, Barnes & Noble, Borders, Amazon, Apple Inc. and many others.
  • eBook (aka ebooks, e-books, etc): are type of electronic book that can be downloaded from a server in many different file formats: EPub, PDF, TXT, HTML just to name a few. They are meant to be read on the go and used as a lighter alternative to carrying actual books with you on travel, work, and leisure.
  • Firmware: This is a term often used to denote the fixed, usually rather small, programs and/or data structures that internally control various electronic devices. Typical examples of devices containing firmware range from end-user products such as remote controls or calculators, through computer parts and devices like hard disks, keyboards, TFT screens or memory cards, all the way to scientific instrumentation and industrial robotics. Also more complex consumer devices, such as mobile phones, digital cameras, synthesizers, etc., contain firmware to enable the device's basic operation as well as implementing higher-level functions.
  • H.263: is a video compression standard originally designed as a low-bitrate compressed format for videoconferencing. It was developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) in a project ending in 1995/1996 as one member of the H.26x family of video coding standards in the domain of the ITU-T.
  • H.264: H.264/MPEG-4 Part 10 or AVC (Advanced Video Coding) is a standard for video compression, and is currently one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of high definition video. The final drafting work on the first version of the standard was completed in May 2003.
  • Hex Key: a Hex Key is a password with a 16-bit level of encryption used in secured 801.11 Wi-Fi connections. It is directly inputted into the router and generally found on a sticker on the external of the router itself, in the router's settings, or your local Internet Service Provider will have it.
  • IEEE 802.11: a set of standards for implementing wireless local area network (WLAN) computer communication in the 2.4, 3.6 and 5 GHz frequency bands. They are created and maintained by the IEEE LAN/MAN Standards Committee (IEEE 802). The base current version of the standard is IEEE 802.11-2007.
  • IEEE 802.11a (aka IEEE 802.11a-1999): an amendment to the IEEE 802.11 specification that added a higher data rate of up to 54 Mbit/s using the 5 GHz band. It has seen widespread worldwide implementation, particularly within the corporate workspace. The amendment has been incorporated into the published IEEE 802.11-2007 standard.
  • IEEE 802.11b (aka IEEE 802.11b-1999): an amendment to the IEEE 802.11 specification that extended throughput up to 11 Mbit/s using the same 2.4 GHz band. This specification under the marketing name of Wi-Fi has been implemented all over the world. The amendment has been incorporated into the published IEEE 802.11-2007 standard.
  • IEEE 802.11g (aka IEEE 802.11g-2003): an amendment to the IEEE 802.11 specification that extended throughput to up to 54 Mbit/s using the same 2.4 GHz band as 802.11b. This specification under the marketing name of Wi-Fi has been implemented all over the world. The 802.11g protocol is now Clause 19 of the published IEEE 802.11-2007 standard.
  • IEEE 802.11n (aka IEEE 802.11n-2009): an amendment to the IEEE 802.11-2007 wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over the two previous standards—802.11a and 802.11g—with a significant increase in the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbit/s to 600 Mbit/s with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.
  • Incoming Mail Server: This is the email server address at which your incoming email is stored, waiting for you to download with your email client.
  • Install/Installation: The act of transferring an application program onto a computer system in such a way that it can be executed in the operating system environment.
  • MAC Address (Media Access Control Address): a unique identifier assigned to network interfaces for communications on the physical network segment. MAC addresses are used for numerous network technologies and most IEEE 802 network technologies including Ethernet. Logically, MAC addresses are used in the Media Access Control protocol sub-layer of the OSI reference model.
  • Micro SD (Secure Digital): A smaller version of the standard SD (Secure Digital) card. It works in the same form as the original, except that it was made in a smaller form factor for use with phones or as storage for tablets due to its small portable size.
  • MOV: The format specifies a multimedia container file that contains one or more tracks, each of which stores a particular type of data: audio, video, effects, or text (e.g. for subtitles). Each track either contains a digitally-encoded media stream (using a specific format) or a data reference to the media stream located in another file.
  • MP3 (aka MPEG-1 or MPEG-2 Audio Layer III): a patented digital audio encoding format using a form of lossy data compression. It is a common audio format for consumer audio storage, as well as a de facto standard of digital audio compression for the transfer and playback of music on digital audio players.
  • MPEG (Moving Picture Experts Group): a working group of experts that was formed by ISO and IEC to set standards for audio and video compression and transmission. It was established in 1988 and its first meeting was in May 1988 in Ottawa, Canada. As of late 2005, MPEG has grown to include approximately 350 members per meeting from various industries, universities, and research institutions. MPEG's official designation is ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29 WG11 - Coding of moving pictures and audio (ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1Subcommittee 29, Working Group 11).
  • MPEG-4: a method of defining compression of audio and visual (AV) digital data. It was introduced in late 1998 and designated a standard for a group of audio and video coding formats and related technology agreed upon by the ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29/WG11) under the formal standard ISO/IEC 14496 - Coding of audio-visual objects. Uses of MPEG-4 include compression of AV data for web (streaming media) and CD distribution, voice (telephone, videophone) and broadcast television applications.
  • Outgoing Mail Server: This is the email server address which is waiting and listening for your outgoing email to be sent to it by your email client.
  • OS/Operating System: software, consisting of programs and data, that runs on computers, manages computer hardware resources, and provides common services for execution of various application software.
  • Port Number: In your manual email setup, this number represents a "portal" or window" that a email server leaves open to listen for communication attempts from your email client.
  • RAM (Random Acces Memory): a form of computer data storage. Today, it takes the form of integrated circuits that allow stored data to be accessed in any order in a constant time, regardless of its physical location and whether it is related to the previous piece of data.
  • ROM (Read-only Mmeory): This is a class of storage medium used in computers and other electronic devices. Data stored in ROM cannot be modified, or can be modified only slowly or with difficulty, so it is mainly used to distribute firmware. In Android devices, the ROM is the protected system storage where the OS and applications reside.
  • Reset (Hard or Factory): Sometimes also referred to as a "factory reset", a hard reset is an extremely serious process, because performing a hard reset will always wipe all the data from your device and return it to the settings it originally had when purchased. In general, only the manufacturer of your device will ever suggest performing a hard reset, and only when all other attempts have failed.
  • Reset (Soft): A "soft" reset is by far the most common type of reset any mobile device user will come across, and is often useful in solving minor problems and strange behaviour. When you perform a soft reset of a device, you are essentially causing the device to stop everything it is running, and restart - much like rebooting a PC. If you had a program open and were entering data into when you perform a soft reset, you might lose the information you were entering, but otherwise a soft reset does not affect any information you have stored on the device at all, and can be performed quite safely.
  • Resistive Screen: This form of touch screen technology features two electronic layers inside the screen separated by a narrow gap. When your finger presses on an area of the screen, these two layers are joined, sending the info to the Cruz processor and translating it as an x/y coordinate input.
  • Root / Root Access / Rooting: (NOTE: This often negates the Manufacturer's Warranty on your device) process that allows users of cellphones, and other devices, running the Android operating system to attain privileged control (known as "root access") within Android's Linux subsystem, similar to jailbreaking on Apple devices running the iOS operating system, overcoming limitations that the carriers and manufacturers put on such phones. This provided greater versatility and access that otherwise was locked down.
  • SD (Secure Digital): This is a type of memory card that can be found for and used with most electronic devices. Most commonly found in cameras or tablets. It can store information as well as move that information from your computer to a device and back again as well as from one device to another.
  • SDHC (Secure Digital High Capacity): This is an extension of the SD standard which increases card's storage capacity up to 32 GB. SDHC cards share the same physical and electrical form factor as older (SD 1.x) cards, allowing SDHC-devices to support both newer SDHC cards and older SD-cards. To increase addressable storage, SDHC uses sector addressing instead of byte addressing as in the previous SD standard. Byte addressing supported card capacities up to 4 GB, whereas sector addressing can theoretically support capacities up to 2 TB (2048 GB). The current standard limits the maximum capacity of an SDHC card to 32 GB (it is expected that the SDHC specification will be revised in the future to allow card capacities greater than 32 GB). SDHC cards will not work in devices designed to the older SD 1.x specification.
  • Secured Wi-Fi Network: This is a Wi-Fi network that has been locked and protected with encryption by the owner or administrator. A password to access the network will be required when attampting to establish a connection. This key is configured in the Wi-Fi router by the owner or administrator.
  • Shortcut (File or App): a small file containing a target URI or GUID, or the name of a target program file that the shortcut represents. The shortcut might additionally specify parameters to be passed to the target program when it is run. Shortcuts are very commonly placed on a desktop, in an application launcher panel, or in the main menu of a desktop environment. In Android environments, shortcuts are placed on the home panels to easily lauch apps.
  • Skin: This is a type of cover you can get for your device. They are either a rubbery gel type protection cover or a decorative graphic that has been printed on to a sticker in order to apply to your device.
  • Stylus: a writing utensil, or a small tool for some other form of marking or shaping, for example in pottery. The word is also used for a computer accessory (PDAs). It usually refers to a narrow elongated staff, similar to a modern ballpoint pen.
  • Tether: Tethering your Cruz allows your computer to access the Cruz's SD storage card(s) as a USB mass storage device on your computer so that you can add, move, delete files on it from your computer.
  • UPC (Universal Product Code): is a barcode symbology (i.e., a specific type of barcode), that is widely used for tracking products in stores. It consists of 12 numerical digits, which are uniquely assigned to each product. For our Velocity Micro Cruz tablet, the UPC will begin with "877935". Due to a recent change in policy and procedures, we now require the UPC from the original box to be provided with the Proof of Purchase for the RMA process.
  • Upload: Upload can refer to the sending of data from a local system to a remote system such as a server or another client with the intent that the remote system should store a copy of the data being transferred, or the initiation of such a process.
  • USB (Universal Serial Bus): a wired serial bus standard to interface computers and electronics devices. It is commonly used to interface computers to computer peripheral, digital cameras and memory devices. In the case of mobile devices, the USB port does not have Host properties. Instead, it is the device normally hosted on other systems as in tethering.
  • WAV (Waveform Audio File Format): a Microsoft and IBM audio file format standard for storing an audio bitstream on PCs. It is an application of the RIFF bitstream format method for storing data in "chunks", and thus is also close to the 8SVX and the AIFF format used on Amiga and Macintosh computers, respectively.
  • WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy): is a security algorithm for IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. It's intention is to provide data confidentiality comparable to that of a traditional wired network.
  • Widget: In computer programming, a widget (or control) is an element of a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays an information arrangement changeable by the user, such as a window or a text box. The defining characteristic of a widget is to provide a single interaction point for the direct manipulation of a given kind of data. In other words, widgets are basic visual building blocks which, combined in an application, hold all the data processed by the application and the available interactions on this data. An Android widget for instance may be an Audio playback control on the homescreen, allowing you to listen to and shuffle through your playlist without opening the Audio app itself.
  • Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity): wireless local area networking based on the IEEE 802.11 standard. There are several versions of the 802.11 standard in common use. Differences between the standards include the frequencies used, the range, and the data transmission rates possible. Perhaps the most common is 802.11b which has a data transmission rate of up to 11 megabits per second (Mbps). The 802.11g standard uses the same frequency range but has a maximum of 54 Mbps. The 802.11a standard has a maximum 54Mbps transfer rate, but uses a different frequency range than b and g.
  • WMA (Windows Media Audio): an audio data compression technology developed by Microsoft. The name can be used to refer to its audio file format or its audio codecs. It is a proprietary technology that forms part of the Windows Media framework.
  • WPA/WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access): security protocols and security certification programs developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to secure IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. The Alliance defined these in response to serious weaknesses researchers had found in the previous system, WEP.